About your Search

20121121
20121129
STATION
CNBC 15
MSNBCW 7
FBC 3
LANGUAGE
English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> steve: yesterday, my wife and i went to the mall and i made the observation and we parked the car we are by the second s in sears. >> gretchen: you are one guy. you are the one guy. >> steve: i could be. study is coming up in a minute. >> brian: you are one of the street level guys >> chris: subteryuan. >> you know what is going to happen 9:30 eastern time this is an mazing. ambassador susan rice will face biggest critics on capitol hill face to face. meeting with senator graham and john mccain and our own kelley wright live with more. kelley, this is an amazing development. it is my understanding that she requested the development. >> she did. they talked about since they were did that they were honored to meet with her. susan rice is the front runner for being nominated as the new secretary of state . that could be the reason why. if so she would need to be confirmed by lawmakers. republicans are outraged over the comments rice made in the u.s. consulate in benghazi. that could be problematic. >> initially it was a spontanous reaction to what transspired in carey as a consequence o
's a trademark. >> greg brown said it, it will stick. >> thank you for coming in. >>> a nation on a cliff, steve rattner, another member of the fix the debt committee. obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is
the conversation with dana and steve. what else we got going on? >> we're going to check on global markets. we are a bit above fair value here, about 8 points. 2 on the nasdaq and the tp would open -- so would you say that's mixed, right? >> i'd say barely bunch oiged. >> what are we waiting for? >> monday for the holidays to be over. a shortened trading day. europe is down just barely. and asia, which has been trading for quite a while longer here, authorize's they're up a little bit. now let's take a look at oil. it's down a little bit. brent right around the 110 mark people have been watching. natural gas down, as well. and the ten year, my favorite gauge, 1.673. nothing's changed. the dollar, what's happening with the dollar here? 1.28. a little more strength -- not much really. >> although that's a stronger euro. big story has been the dollar-yen. some sense that there will be serious spending out of japan. finally, gold. a measure of a lot of things here. up five bucks. time for the global markets report and we have ross westgate standing by in london. any news out of mario draghi in. >>
president is under fire in his own country after what his opponents call a big power grab. steve harrigan has more from cairo. >> yeg, some dramatic developments here in cairo. egypt's president trying to expand his own powers dramatically, saying that any of his presidential decrees issued since he took office six months ago cannot be overturned by anybody, including the courts. and that those previous officials who could be implicated in murdering demonstrators during the revolution a year ago would be retried. as one morsey opponent put it, he is basically putting himself above the having no one to check his powers. we have seen street protests. those protests could grow dramatically with these new announcements by the egyptian president. it comes on the heels of a real diplomatic success in the world spotlight here. president morsey helping to negotiate a cease-fire between israel and hamas. really, making the unusual step of receiving praise from all sides from u.s. officials from hamas, even from some israeli officials for his pragmatism but certainly that imagine that tism in its o
about over his controversial decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. steve harrigan is streaming live from care row. what can you tell us. >> details of the offices of the muslim brotherhood. attack happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waiting for as far as the demonstrations, when pro and anti-people on the ground will try and march. we'll get
. steve harrigan with the news live in cairo. steve? >> it took 18 nights of street protests, almost two years ago to drive out hosni mubarak from power. now we're on night number five of protests again egypt's first democratically elected president and for the first time, the sound of the protests feel exactly the same as those that drove out his predecessor. even some of the chants are the same, leave, leave. those protesters came from a number of different political parties today totaling more than 200,000 people. they were chanting, they were violent at the edges of the protests, mainly the younger protesters battling with police, squirmishing on the edges with rocks and tear gas as well. as far as president morsi goes, his show of compromise by meeting with judges yesterday has largely been rejected by the protesters. instead, opposition leaders say there will be no compromise, no deal with the president until he backs down completely and rescinds his decree. otherwise, they say they will stay out here on the streets. shepherd. >> shepard: steve harrigan live in cairo. for years, wo
to the financial system. >> steve, if only the market could focus on just the economy, which actually seems to be chugging along okay. if you look at durables, consumer confidence, the ongoing recovery and housing, it's the overhang of the cliff that's spooking everybody. >> yeah, we've had somewhat better numbers. the new home sales today, not great. maybe sandy affected even though the government said it wasn't. the economy's okay. it may be more of a 2% plus economy in the fourth quarter than is being given credit on the street. it's not gang busters. the question has been for a long time -- by the way, there's some headlines from the beige book. you can see it really did affect the northeast, new york, and new jersey especially. so we'll see some of that in the data in the months ahead. we'll be seeing some rebuilding going on. you know, i would not make a call here on the economy, scott, to say go ahead and invest in the economy. after the fiscal cliff everything is fine. i think there's a reason for cautious optimism, but i don't think there's a reason to think it's going to go gang b
i'm steve kroft. thanks for joining us. [ticking] [ticking] >> it is the mark of the yakuza: ornate, full-body tattoos that cover the members of the japanese mob. so how did one of their most notorious godfathers get into america and jump to the front of a line for a lifesaving liver transplant? this reporter found out and says it may cost him his life. >> as he was leaving and getting in his car, he said, "that"-- you know, "that--that goddamn american jew reporter. i want to kill him." [ticking] >> greg mortenson's book three cups of tea is a publishing phenomenon that has made him a celebrity, a cult-like figure on the lecture circuit, and inspired people to give nearly $60 million to his charity, and it all began with one simple story. >> it's a beautiful story, and it's a lie. >> we wanted to talk to mortenson about that and some other things, but he didn't want to talk to 60 minutes. >> steve kroft. >> nice to meet you. >> how you doing? >> thanks. >> got five minutes for us today? >> um... [ticking] >> we wondered how the man who could whistle up a corporate jet on a whim...
with the government. yesterday prosecutors charged a former employee of the firm with insider trading. but steve coen is said to have personally signed off on the series of transaction. the government alleges that former s.a.c. employee helped the firm avoid losses and bring profits in totaling $276 million by using insider tips he got from a doctor about test results. prosecutors are calling this the most lucrative insider trading scheme ever. and the last time that people said well, of course we do -- what, they pay research organizations. >> expert networks and all this. >> expert networks. people that are paid to know how -- do you could even go and talk to -- i guess can you talk to some of the patients that are in the clinical trial and get some anecdotal evidence? >> you might be allowed to do that. this is different. >> this is the guy who's running it. >> and he's telling the investor what to do. the question i have -- and i've known steve coen for a long time. i have a huge amount of respect for him. >> does he know what he's getting? >> thus far they've been trying to go after steve foreve
's foreign minister to discuss the crisis. where are we? steve harrigan with the news live tonight from cairo. steve? >> shepard, we're hearing some pretty regular small explosions behind us right now. that is tear gas being fired. so much tear gas has been fired in this section of cairo in the past four days it's basically hanging here like a cloud. today we saw president morsey make some attempt at compromise reaching out to some of his harshest critics, the chief judges here in cairo trying to assure him that the powers that he assumed are only temporary and only apply to, quote: sovereign matters without really defining what those sovereign matters are or changing the decrees that gave him that power in any way. those moves are unlikely to satisfy the protesters out on the street and tomorrow they're planning a major march against the president. initially there was a second march planned as well. this time why the muslim brotherhood in support of the president. they cancelled that one due to fears of violence after four days of street protests here. 400 people wounded. one killed tomorro
is heading back out onto the trail. he does know he won, right? >> i'm steve kornacki. for me of us it's home for the holidays. you get a rare chance to see old friends and distant relatives. the bad news is you get a chance to see old friends and distant relatives. >> i'm making a pledge to my friend grover norquist. you're in "the cycle," and you have my word it's going to be good. >>> the case against ambassador susan rice as a successor to hillary clinton deepens. she went to the hill today to smooth it over with senators mccain, ayotte and graham who criticized her original comments on the deadly benghazi attacks. i picture the conversation between the president and rice going like this. we want you as secretary of state, so go make nice. answer their questions so they stop attacking you and threatening to block your possible nomination. yeah, so how did that work out? >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get. it is clear that the information that she gave the american public was incorrect. >> bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than
at this point. >> reporter: one of the speakers constituents, steve hightower, has a petroleum distribution business, like the economy is doing well. he has known boehner for years and believes the speaker wants to make a deal with president obama to avoid the fiscal cliff and impact on families but also seen washington's disfunction and has his doubts. >> somewhat just like the president, time to go ahead and do your job. >> reporter: speaker boehner is secure enough in his own district here north of cincinnati i-75 that his constituents will give him a freehand to negotiate. his bigger challenge is pulling together republicans from districts across the country behind any deal he ultimately strikes with president obama. the next four weeks that is the challenge john boehner, eric canter, and candidates on the house and senate are going to find. how do you put together a deal that not only the leaders agree upon but members of the caucuses can give majority to us in both houses? >> indeed, john, thank you very much. >>> meantime, some important economic data came out today and if you were l
didn't want to talk to 60 minutes. >> steve kroft. >> nice to meet you. >> how you doing? >> thanks. >> got five minutes for us today? >> um... [ticking] >> we wondered how the man who could whistle up a corporate jet on a whim... >> let's rock. >> or throw a $2 million birthday party was doing in his reduced circumstances. what's it like to go from king of the world to prisoner number 05a-4820 serving 8 to 25 years behind bars? >> in my wildest imagination, when i would project myself into my late 50s and early 60s, where i would be or what i would be doing, if i make a list of 100 different places or 100 different things, here would never make that list. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm morley safer. in this edition, we look at stories of crime, punishment, and what money can buy. first, the high-stakes world of japanese organized crime, where big dollars saved the life of an infamous gangster. then we investigate how best-selling author and philanthropist greg mortenson used some of the assets of his multimillion-dollar charity. and finally, we talk to dennis kozlowski, the
. sorry, steve, slope isn't as dramatic. this is a tease. >> i'm steve kornacki and i wouldn't do that. the person we turn to for answers when the arab spring first sprung. >> i'm krystal ball. it's so secret it has to be hand carried from office to office. it's a story the administration divided on one of the most controversial tools. >> i'm susan del percio. s.e.'s on assignment. >> you're in "the cycle" where anything can happen. we're back to work here on "the cycle" today and congress is slowly making its
on corning at 7%. >> this is a stock -- everyone loves corning technologically including the late steve jobs. it's been a dog of a stock. >> goldman likes things that have exposure to men. >> foot locker and crocks come out as their buys. steve madden is a sell. i think foot locker as nike. those who want to play nike, substantial chinese business and over inventory. you want to say the best way to think about nike going over par, genuine "wall street journal" for 100 is look at foot locker and say they sell a lot of nike. >> they say we favor athletic for the stickier male customer base which sounds disgusting. >> yeah. >> the countdown to christmas marches on. did cyber-monday kill black friday this year? we'll explore that question. santelli talks to sheila bair. here what she has to say about banks, fiscal cliff and bailouts. first, the opening bell. tuesday trading action when "squawk on the street" comes back. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with peop
and giving speeches. >> joining me now is new york democratic congressman steve israel. sir, great to have you with us. mitch mcconnell saying the president should be speaking to members of his own party. interestingly enough, moments ago we heard from someone within mitch mcconnell's party, speaker john boehner, saying he thinks a deal is possible. take a listen. >> it's time for the president and democrats to get serious about the spending problem that our country has. but i'm optimistic. >> he's optimistic. we also have boehner saying he is disagreeing with tom cole, one of the few republicans who have come out to usual his party to strike a deal. right now, get this done. keeping the bush tax cults for 98% of americans, give up on keeping tax cuts low for the wealthy, 2%. take a listen to what cole on capitol hill had to say moments ago. >> in my view, we all agree that we're not going to raise taxes on people who make less than $250,000. we should take them out of this discussion right now and continue to fight against any rate increase, continue to try to work honestly for a much big
about as remote as you can get. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. we live on an increasingly endangered planet, from the glaciers of antarctica to the rich prairie lands of canada. and the ultimate disaster may be financial as well as environmental. later in this episode, scott pelley reports from antarctica on the wide-ranging effects of global warming. and later bob simon has a story from canada on the environmental damage caused by the next great oil rush. but our first story involves a controversial waste product that could have damaging effects on the environment. there are more than 600 coal-fired power plants generating electricity in the u.s., and those plants produce 130 million tons of waste called coal ash. it contains concentrations of mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic materials. and as lesley stahl first reported in 2009, when coal ash is dumped into wet ponds--and there are more than 500 of those across the country-- the result can have an enormous health risk on the people living in nearby communities. >> we get about 48%, nearly half o
partners don't kill you. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. in this edition, we look at the multibillion dollar business of international crime. first, we report on the theft of an eye-popping fortune stolen from the iraq treasury. then we take a look at shoplifting gangs from south america. and finally we go undercover in china to expose rampant product counterfeiting. we begin in iraq with the theft that's been called one of the largest of its time, the mother of all heists. and it happened right under the noses of u.s. advisers. as iraqi investigators told us in october of 2006, more than half a billion dollars had disappeared from the defense ministry-- money that was supposed to equip the iraqi military. investigators believe the very people that the united states had entrusted with the funds had stolen them. but it seemed neither the u.s. nor its allies had much of an appetite for pursuing the matter. >> people have died. moneys have gone missing. culprits are running around the world, hiding and scurrying around. i have to ask myself why has this happened? it i
it will happen. lou: the president himself may have been talking to you or steve forbes. >> this is a great time. not only that, let's not forget that the last time that the senate had a budget is when harry reid worked with his friend, and nobody in the 2008 budget complained that they weren't spending enough money. that cuts out a trillion in spending right there. are you concerned about the time that they had taken have taken on this first day of the discussion? >> i was not hopeful that the president's tone. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] lou: are you being partisan here? >> i am not being partisan. i am being objective when i say that the president pays 1.6 trillion in new revenues. he wants to destroy the economy. no one in their right mind is going to allow that kind of increase to devastate the economy. lou: that's a good point. it's interesting that no one is talking about the fact that individual tax payment, 26% of the bush tax cuts over the past two years, the answer here is this. i just want to see everybody be happy. let me turn to benghazi. there is a palpable
're going to do it my way or no other way? we're going to raise it to 90 -- to 39.6%. steve rattner had a great column yesterday. >> it's a must-read. >> you know there's more than one way to skin a cat, more than one way to raise over a trillion dollars in revenues. it doesn't just have to be the president's way. is the white house going to insist on the 39.6% tax rate, or will they consider the loophole part of it plus capital gains, plus a couple of other things? >> well, it looks to me like the white house has learned something over the course of the last four years which is that you don't start a negotiation by negotiating against yourself. >> right. >> you know, the president's taking a hard line right now because he feels as though he campaigned on this issue pretty strongly for the past year. but the president has been willing to compromise on a lot of things in the past and, you know, it's right for him to stake out a tough negotiating position and then maybe make his way to a less strident or a less -- not strident -- but a less -- a more flexible position down the road. >> yo
online. steve wright's the reality is we no longer depend on true american patriots to overcome the masses of those who will want to hand out. in the next four years will get worse. unless some unexpected event changes the direction of a country may god help us. we end on a light note. an audition tape made by the beetles that was rejected by record producer will go up for auction next week. will probably go down as one of the biggest blunders in business history. the record executive decided against signing the beatles because he is widely reported to have said these groups are on
the company from several angles. i heard 675 as target. not sure if that's right. >> upswing coming. steve is an old friend of mine. good time to add position. valuation low. earnings momentum. how many citigroup analysts does it take to change -- that's a different piece of research. i do believe that apple is that sweet spot where people are saying that sell-off finished and maybe all of the big selling is done. i don't know how far i can go. i just think that in the end they did miss two quarters. they have to make this quarter. i don't know. they have to make it. >> if it were a man, you say he's not the same man as he was before? apple. if the stock were a person? >> more of an aaron rodgers than eli manning. >> that's not good in light of last night. >> only as good as your last game. >> manning didn't look that great. >> listen, eagles play the carolina panthers. do you want me to -- could you lend me eli tonight? >> who is the starting quarterback for the eagles? >> that's what they're trying to figure out themselves. >> this is far field. >> maybe they'll take smith over there. >>
out. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> the market >>> the market rallying all week as if a fiscal cliff deal is as good as done. but are we setting ourselves up for a fall here? >> zero chance of a deal? you're scaring the kids. cnbc contributor zach caramel is more optimistic. while mike santoli says a deal is already priced into the market. mr. party pooper, why do you think we get no deal at all? >> the same composition of congress existed before the election is what we have after the election. nothing happened before then. i'm just repeating what lawmakers said. chris van howen, representative out of maryland, said if nothing is done before they go on summer
parr, steve allen. he has not broken in his 20 something years on the air, he has not broken one major act. >> bill: you know, it's a different time now andaj the ratings pressure i bs so intense. >> jay is numberre one. do whatever he wants. >> bon jovi ride in air force one with the president. that's pretty cool. joe biden, he had to drive up in a van with the guys who sang "who let the dogs out." >> you can tell me 10 minutes a weekho going to destroy your whole career, i'm not buying that all i say to jay leno is do whatin was done for you. that's all. and now jay used to come on every five to six weeks on the letterman show. i got him on the merv griffin show a billion times. that's what happened. it doesn't hurt you if you bring on the new guy because you want to see somebody knew. when johnny carson was the host. we didn't know johnny carson. high exsoughted vatican leader. when jay leno took over, it was one of us. and wen said okay, our guy is is in. yea! and it would be like bill closinggetting in and the door to james carville. >> bill: you were down in the -- i didn't see y
] >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. in this edition, we look at three stories linked by the financial collapse of 2008. first, we examine a scam that's cost thousands of americans their homes. then we look into wall street's shadow market of credit default swaps. finally, a report on the perilous state of state finances. we begin with the foreclosure crisis. in the aftermath of the great recession, the huge number of foreclosed properties was a significant factor in weighing down the economy. many were stuck on the market for an unexpected reason: the banks couldn't find the ownership documents. as scott pelley first reported in april 2011, lenders wanting to evict people found that often, the legal documents behind the mortgages simply weren't there. caught in a jam of their own making, some companies appeared to have resorted to forgery to throw people down on their luck out of their homes. >> these folks on the street aren't homeless. they slept on the sidewalk because they want to keep their homes. facing foreclosure, they camped out to get in line to beg their ba
friday heating up as shorps are out in full force trying to snag the big deals. we'll go to steve, outside of best buy in dallas, texas. good morning to you. is it mad are you open at 4:20 or five? >> good morning, i actul what, this store opened at midnight and that was good news for shoppers and not for news crews. there is not a lot going on here. midnight opening resonates with the consumers that it is easier to stay up late than wake up early and go shopping and i tell you, they lined up days ago for the red hot door buster deals. folks were camped out and best buy handed out a voucher system at 10 o'clock last night. and the first thipping to go on the list. 40 inch to should i ba flat screen tv for 180 bungs. but you didn't have to camp out over night. bunch of the door busters are still on hand. $800 for the sam sung tv regularly. 1500. andy of the 250 computers in stock and tablets and this computer as well. not because fewer people are shopping but they are better prepared. there will be fewer foot traffic customers. most people are checking out the deals on line for wee
tomorrow, sunday morning at 8:00. we'll have democratic congressman, steve cone and the situation in gaza and the crazy news out of eyipt. mohamed morsi, one of the most fascinating world figures. one day i helps negotiate a cease-fire and the next doe layers himself a unilateral dictator. we are going to dive deep and look at the outcome and the winners from losers from the gaza situation and we will be talking about susan rice an the future of foreign policy. >>> coming up next, melissa mayor ris perry. wi what will the first lady do with her second term? that and the definition of family when melissa harris perry ges gets going next. we'll see you right here tomorrow at 8:00. thanks for getting up. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores.
thrilled. steve israel, the chairman of the dccc put out a fund-raising e-mail saying that paul ryan. they planned -- >> however good you think that is, it didn't work. what did he -- >> let me address that. he actually won the seniors vote. i think he has opened up the possibility both for president obama and congressional republicans, and you saw this in this poll that came out, center left organization, talking about people are open on entitlement reform in a way they haven't been in the past and i think romney/ryan broke through a little bit on that. other policy areas. look, republicans have to do a better job over the next couple years, particularly the republican think tank community, has to do a better job of thinking through about how to talk about middle class economics and go into the r and d business. i'm a supply sider, i'm as much of a believer in, you know, pro growth supply side economics as anybody, but the anchor for every one of our debates about our economic future, cannot simply be about marginal tax rates as much as i support keeping marginal tax rates low. we h
point that steve rattner made over the weekend which is all the guys and the women i know on wall street, none of them have ever become less energetic, less workaholics because of the capital gains rate at 25%. >> or 39.6%. >> hey, can i ask you about that, because -- help me understand this. we have a lot of people talking about how we need to 0 raise more taxes. >> sure. >> and i hear -- i hear the president talking about moving the top tax rate up to 39.6%. and i'm just wondering, is that as equitable an approach when a lot of really rich guys and women look at that 39.6%? right now i'm never going to pay that. >> yeah. >> would it be better to raise the capital-gains tax and say 15 to 20 or 15 to 25 percent would that help with income disparity a bit more? >> well, that's why i suggest a minimum tax, because you're absolutely right. of the 400 highest incomes in 2009, which average $200 million apiece, a quarter of the people paid at a rate under you 15%. so the only way to get it back is to have a minimum tax. >> how many of those would you bet, if you had to make a bet, paid 39.6%?
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)